Einstein on my mind

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I’d been thinking about an Einstein quote regarding technology becoming greater than humanity. I could spend a lifetime on Google trying to identify its context and viability. Nonetheless, this quote seems to pop up most:

It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has exceeded our humanity.


I think it’s true and sad. I was thinking about it because of my new grandson, Patrick Xavier. He’s smiling on purpose now, even giggling. He’s moving around more, and his world clearly is becoming larger. But his world still revolves around his mom for nourishment, a clean diaper, dry clothes, warmth and, dare I say it…love. Pure innocence and some kind of innate understanding—some will call it faith—that his needs will be met, humanity will prevail.

For what else is it when his mom or dad or aunt or sister hold him close, and he’s fed and warm and dry, and he looks at the world with such wonder and grins? He needs nothing else to be happy. Humanity in its simplicity is so obvious and so easy and already so perfect.

Leave it to us adults to muck it up.

The numbers alone tell the story. How lucky he is to be born a white male in the USA. How lucky he is to be surrounded by family on both sides who love him unconditionally and who would do anything to ensure his comfort, especially right now when he is helplessly only months olds.

All sad but true, as is this:  Neither the latest operating system or the largest 3D HD TV is associated with anything that makes him happy. And wouldn’t it be great if it never does?

If only the awe and curiosity and marvel of the world could be appreciated by Patrick his entire life, like the love and humanity that fuels him now. His intelligence could grow to its endless potential by using all those I-Phones, I-Pads and Androids as resources, but not as anything related to humanity. All of us surrounding him and by association all of us who experience the same would continue providing the identical unconditional love despite the imperfections we all grow into.

Per my quest of Einstein’s quote, technology may open open worlds of information that can help our population, but it’s yet to be demonstrated that any of that new knowledge has improved our humanity. In looking for the above quote, I came across this one from Einstein, too. A brilliant mind. I wonder if his heart hurt as he grew older.

Common sense is the collection of prejudices acquired by age eighteen.
We can only hope Patrick and all of those creating offspring will allow humanity to rule over all else, no matter what lessons he, his sister and their friends might pick up from the technology in their classrooms and common sense in the lunchrooms of grammar and high school. 

We already possess Humanity. What if we stop focusing on the technology, and use it solely as the resource it was meant? What we’re doing for Patrick and others we must continue to do if a sense of peace and happiness are truly important:  Love and trust our family, be there for them without question or condition. It’s easy when we’re talking about an 11-lb. bundle. Yet, I still see both of my girls like that. Let’s teach our kids to look at the own world the same way, every day. 

Naïve, nonetheless nothing to lose. At least put your laptop or phone down and hug someone as a reminder of the human-ness of humanity. C’mon, you don’t even have to tell the recipient why. It’s really all that counts. Really.

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